Dana----EPO & GrapeSeed

Discuss autism diets and biomedical treatments of autism.

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Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Fri Jan 26, 2007 11:06 am

On pine bark

A new study to be published in the June 17 edition of the journal of European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry shows a significant reduction of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms in children after supplementing with Pycnogenol® (pic-noj-en-all), an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, everyday for one month

"The results of this study show Pycnogenol may serve as a safe, effective treatment for children diagnosed with ADHD. French maritime pine bark extract reduced hyperactivity among study participants, while improving attention and visual-motor coordination and concentration of these children," said Rohdewald


Grapeseed/pine bark:

Grapeseed Extract:
Grapseed Extract is a vital antioxidant that scours damaging free-radicals from your system. Free radicals cause oxidative damage to the body - a literal 'rusting' of tissues and cells

Pycnogenol:
This trademarked extract contains over 40 identified constituents and comes from bark of Maritime pine found on the coast of South France. It is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. It is one of the few clinically studied herbs and it has been shown that it helps extend the life of Vitamin C in the body, helps increase blood flow and restricts blood vessels

Grape seed extract (GSE) is just what it sounds like – an extract from grape seeds. The seeds are typically from red grapes (instead of white), which have a high content of compounds known as oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs). The OPCs are also present in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, including pine bark (Pycnogenol) and green tea, where, like grape seed extract, they possess potent antioxidant properties

Grape seed extract is safe when used as directed. No adverse effects have been associated with its use.



Soooo, grape seed is similar to the very expensive Pycnogenol. I wanted to try grapeseed to see if it helps, it does, and now will take the $plunge$ and add in the Pycnogenol.

I could not find my original file on GSE, I know this above info is not the best explaination, but was all I could locate this morning.

Dana ,
I always find your posts so fascinating. You are really doing a great job with your son as you are reaping the rewards with all the progress he has made


Carlie, thank you so much! Hope some of this info helps. Good luck and blessings.
Dana

Dana
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Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Fri Jan 26, 2007 11:38 am

I'm posting as I locate info....sorry.

The south of France being blessed with two of the richest sources of pycnogenols—grapes and the French maritime pine, Professor Masquelier had abundant raw material. In 1951 he patented a method of extracting Pycnogenols from pine bark, and in 1970 extended this same technique to cover grape seed. For a number of reasons, however, all research, clinical trials, and the present French pharmaceutical form have used grape seed extract, and in France, where the product has been on the market for years, OPC from grape seeds outsells that from pine bark about 5:1.



So, maybe grapeseed extract can be used in place of pycnogenols.
Dana

Carlie
Posts: 82
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:33 pm

Postby Carlie » Fri Jan 26, 2007 2:24 pm

Wow!
Don't go crazy looking for the other stuff if you don't have it handy.
I really appreciate all this info. Thanks, Dana.

Joey'smom
Posts: 1619
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 1:19 am

Postby Joey'smom » Mon Jan 29, 2007 4:54 pm

Interesting. I was out this weekend looking at various grape and cranberry juice products. I saw one grape juice brand that actually had grape seed extract added ... and it was for antioxidant effect.
Joey, 10 yrs., PDD-NOS was our last dx
GFCF, Yasko, ABA
Hoping to get to RDI

Joey'smom
Posts: 1619
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 1:19 am

Postby Joey'smom » Sun Feb 04, 2007 12:03 am

I have a question - when do you give these supplements? In the a.m./pm.? With or without food? Let me know as we are about to start! :)
Joey, 10 yrs., PDD-NOS was our last dx
GFCF, Yasko, ABA
Hoping to get to RDI

Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Sun Feb 04, 2007 2:35 pm

I give with his vitamin A and E, and CLO, usually after school. Sometimes in a crunch for time, I give with his vitamins. I don't give with amino acids, enzymes, antifungals, or probiotics (just because these all need to be given individually). I do not divide the dose of EPO or Grapeseed, it is given once daily.
Dana

mbzoltan
Posts: 261
Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2007 8:11 pm

Postby mbzoltan » Sun Feb 04, 2007 4:22 pm

I have to chime in. I've been lurking for nearly a year here.

We've been doing biomed since August 2005, when my son was dx with Asperger's. He's now 8 y 3 mo, we we were one of the "late" biomed folks.

Between GFCF, HNI enzymes, and a host of supplements and amino acids, as well as homeschooling (long story there), my ds has made remarkable progress. Most new people don't know he has any issues, and friends and family say he's gone from being a fairly disturbed-seeming kid to just quirky-funny now.

This week he was scheduled to sit for a 1.5 hour computerized standardized test to see if he qualified for admission into a university distance education program (a program for elementary kids run by a university). He had to go in--alone, without me--to a room with 10 computers (adults at the other 9 stations, taking the GREs, LSATs, etc.), sit still in the chair, follow the computer's instructions, NOT SPEAK, NOT JUMP AROUND, etc. For 1.5 hours. With 1 ten minute break. :shock:

Last week I read this thread and got grape seed extract and EPO, hoping they would help with his hyperness and difficulty sitting still. He took both for 1 week before the test.

I have never, in my son's entire life, seen him follow directions 100% like he did for that test. He was completely, 100% "neurotypical"--in fact, he acted like a NT kid on best behavior.

It was unbelievable. The testing administrators complimented me on how well-behaved he was. They didn't know his dx--we requested no special accommodations because we were curious to see how he would do without them.

And then the next day, we had a playdate with a new kid. New kid, new kid's house, new setting. Perfect behavior.

This weekend we noticed a bit of the hyperactivity and non-listening come back. Now that I read the rest of this thread, I realized that on Thursday I stopped giving the grape seed and epo separately and blending it in with enzymes. Whoops! We'll go back to giving it separately.

THANK YOU for posting about this topic!!

Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Sun Feb 04, 2007 6:33 pm

mbzoltan,

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you sooo much for sharing your experience with epo and gse. I love to hear how other kids are responding, and it is just remarkable and fantastic!!! I am so thrilled that it is helping others as much as it does for my little guy! I know it is a blessing to us to have discovered these 2 supplements! My son has been able to leave the special ed room and work his way back into the regular ed. classroom since starting!

It was unbelievable. The testing administrators complimented me on how well-behaved he was. They didn't know his dx--we requested no special accommodations because we were curious to see how he would do without them


I love this, that's fantastic! :D :D :D
Dana

Joey'smom
Posts: 1619
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 1:19 am

Postby Joey'smom » Sun Feb 04, 2007 10:53 pm

MZ, that is an amazing story - congratulations to you and to your son!

We're set to try this. If it can stop those dreaded notes from coming home on "poor focus" I'll be doing backflips.

Thanks, Dana, for your quick response! :)
Joey, 10 yrs., PDD-NOS was our last dx
GFCF, Yasko, ABA
Hoping to get to RDI

mom2sarah&sam
Posts: 107
Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2006 2:06 am

Postby mom2sarah&sam » Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:55 am

Dana, how far away from anything do enzymes have to be given? I give Sarah her CLO at breakfast and I started giving her the EPO and grapeseed extract then as well (just about two weeks ago). I started enzymes this morning with breakfast and gave her another one at dinner, but then I read this. Should I not be giving enzymes with breakfast if the other supps are given then?
Hannah
Mom to my precious little girl Sarah-6 ASD and all boy Samuel-4 NT as can be!

Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:29 pm

You can give enzymes before the meal (up to 30 minutes prior) and then wait until after the meal to give other supplements. I try to keep at least a 60 minute seperation. So my son will take his enzyme while I am preparing his meal, eat, then right before we walk out the door to school he will take his vitamins.
Dana

mbzoltan
Posts: 261
Joined: Sat Feb 03, 2007 8:11 pm

Postby mbzoltan » Mon Feb 05, 2007 6:24 pm

A quick update: my son got into the program!

Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Mon Feb 05, 2007 6:29 pm

A quick update: my son got into the program!


Woo Hoo!! Congratulations!
Dana

LauraP
Posts: 333
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2005 3:44 pm

Postby LauraP » Fri Feb 09, 2007 12:04 am

Dana,

What is your opinion on borage oil? Do you think EPO is better?

The borage oil (1.3 g softgel) that Ian takes every day contains 781 mg omega-6 fatty acids (469 mg LA, 312 mg GLA) and 226 mg omega-9 fatty acids (oleic acid).

From what I read from the EPO label, it seems to be similar stuff.
Laura, Ian's mom

Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Fri Feb 09, 2007 3:08 pm

Hi Laura,

I don't have much research on hand on borage, but if it is meeting the GLA needs I probably would not switch.

:wink:
Dana

LauraP
Posts: 333
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2005 3:44 pm

Postby LauraP » Fri Feb 09, 2007 3:33 pm

Thanks, Dana. :)
Laura, Ian's mom

Dadoftwinboys
Posts: 379
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2005 2:30 pm

Postby Dadoftwinboys » Sun Feb 18, 2007 10:54 am

Interesting article on fatty acid metabolism from

http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf ... thispage=1

Jersey scientists find a possible key to autism
Sunday, February 18, 2007
BY PEGGY O'CROWLEY
Star-Ledger Staff

A team of New Jersey scientists believes it has found ways to detect biological risk factors for autism through simple urine and blood tests, a discovery that could lead to groundbreaking medical treatment for the neurological disorder.

The team of 16 scientists, mostly drawn from the campuses of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, say their findings, the result of more than two years of study on how the body breaks down fatty acids, could be a breakthrough for what is the fastest-growing developmental disorder in the nation, with no known cause or cure.

The UMDNJ researchers say they have found that children with autism are unable to metabolize key fatty acids that help the body fight inflammation that causes damage to the brain and other organs.

"It's an exciting story that's unfolding," said George Lambert, coordinator of the 15-member research team.

The potential treatment, members of the team say, is a kind of "therapeutic cocktail" tailored to each child, which would give them a dose of a "good" fatty acid that they are not able to make on their own. Team member Bernd Spur of UMDNJ-Stratford created the chemical process to replicate one of those good fatty acids.

"The pathway doesn't work (in the body), so we circumvent it," said Spur, a chemist.

Currently, the only way to diagnose autism is by a clinical assessment of symptoms, which include difficulty with communication and social interaction, as well as obsessive behaviors and interests. New Jersey has a high incidence of the disorder, affecting 1 in 94 children in the state, compared with 1 in 150 in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers say that in the future a person's risk for autism could be measured with a simple urine test that would look for high levels of "bad" fat molecules, or a blood test that could reveal genetic problems, including the absence of a key gene, called GSTM1, which is responsible for metabolizing good fats. Many people with autism do not have this gene.

Xue Ming, a neuroscientist and a founding director of the Autism Center at UMNDJ-Newark, discovered that children with autism have higher levels of bad fat molecules in their urine than typical children.

No one understands yet why it is that so many children with autism have such metabolic differences, but Ming suggested it might be caused by an interaction between genes and the environment. It may be that having less of these key fats reduces the body's ability to deal with environmental and metabolic stress.

The UMDNJ researchers say they have found that children with autism are unable to metabolize key fatty acids that help the body fight inflammation that causes damage to the brain and other organs.

"It's an exciting story that's unfolding," said George Lambert, coordinator of the 15-member research team.

The potential treatment, members of the team say, is a kind of "therapeutic cocktail" tailored to each child, which would give them a dose of a "good" fatty acid that they are not able to make on their own. Team member Bernd Spur of UMDNJ-Stratford created the chemical process to replicate one of those good fatty acids.

"The pathway doesn't work (in the body), so we circumvent it," said Spur, a chemist.

Currently, the only way to diagnose autism is by a clinical assessment of symptoms, which include difficulty with communication and social interaction, as well as obsessive behaviors and interests. New Jersey has a high incidence of the disorder, affecting 1 in 94 children in the state, compared with 1 in 150 in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers say that in the future a person's risk for autism could be measured with a simple urine test that would look for high levels of "bad" fat molecules, or a blood test that could reveal genetic problems, including the absence of a key gene, called GSTM1, which is responsible for metabolizing good fats. Many people with autism do not have this gene.

Xue Ming, a neuroscientist and a founding director of the Autism Center at UMNDJ-Newark, discovered that children with autism have higher levels of bad fat molecules in their urine than typical children.

No one understands yet why it is that so many children with autism have such metabolic differences, but Ming suggested it might be caused by an interaction between genes and the environment. It may be that having less of these key fats reduces the body's ability to deal with environmental and metabolic stress.

At Harvard University, researchers are working on treatments for asthma and periodontal disease, while researchers at Louisiana State University are focusing on stroke.

Team members have been meeting every week for more than two years to discuss the results of their experiments. They include Lambert, a pediatric toxicologist who looks at the impact of the environment on children; Spur, the chemist who replicated the fatty acid in the lab; neurologist William Johnson, who associated the missing gene with autism; and Ming, a neuroscientist who tested for the presence of bad lipids in children.

So far, the scientists have obtained six patents for their research, Lambert said. They soon will meet with the Food and Drug Administration to discuss the requirements for producing and testing their substances, he added.

"Metabolic issues in autism are entirely understudied," said Sophia Colamarino, science director for Cure Autism Now, a major advocacy and research group in Los Angeles. "It's a very exciting area. There is accumulating evidence that would clearly tell me this is where I should look."

The New Jersey scientists are cautious, however, about their preliminary results, and warn families not to expect a miracle cure. Testing on humans, they say, could take a few years.

Meanwhile, the researchers are preparing a preliminary study to begin in September. Lambert hopes to work with 5- to 7-year-olds at the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center in New Brunswick, a school for children with autism run by Rutgers.

Lambert will be giving the children doses of a good fatty acids to see if they have any noticeable effect on the children's cognitive, social and behavioral states. The study will use a control group of similar students.

"New Jersey is the perfect place to do this," said Lambert, director of the EPA-funded Center for Neurotoxicology. "We have a high incidence (of autism), a long history of activism and a strong community."

Peggy O'Crowley may be reached at pocrowley@starledger.com or 973-392-5810
Vance
Dad of 8 year old autistic twins Jesse and Alexander

momtoMatthew
Posts: 813
Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2005 5:47 pm

Postby momtoMatthew » Sun Feb 18, 2007 12:15 pm

Since we are still posting to this topic, I have to say again.....THANK YOU Dana for recommending EPO and GrapeSeed Extract. We are just continuously seeing amazing stuff since starting it.

On the Support side of the board I posted a brag thread about a situation Matthew had during recess where he actually went up to his teacher and told her about another child throwing mulch at him. He has never done this before.....normally he doesn't realize when someone is being mean to him so he doesn't understand why or that he should let someone know. This is a HUGE deal for us...one of my biggest fears ya know!

Then this morning he was watching playhouse Disney and when Mickey was asking questions to the "audience" (viewers) Matthew was answering much more complicated (for him) questions correctly. For example they asked "what would we use to make a valentine card?"....showing a picture of an air pump, crayons, and another object (can't recall now what it was). Normally that question would have been too complicated for him to follow...it would have needed to be broken down more simply.

Well he GOT IT...he answered "crayons" :D :D :D :D :D :D

Dana
Posts: 2778
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:22 pm

Postby Dana » Sun Feb 18, 2007 6:59 pm

WAY TO GO MATTHEW!!!!! Ruth, I am just so happy for you and Matthew! This is huge, and this makes my heart feel all warm and proud! I am so very proud of you and Matthew and please continue to post his progress :D :D
Dana

lookingforanswers
Posts: 2571
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 5:55 pm

Postby lookingforanswers » Wed Feb 21, 2007 10:07 pm

What is grapeFRUIT seed extract for? I saw it on Kirkmans site and thought it was the same as grape seed (unfortunately)!


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